High-Resolution Population Density Mapping by Facebook and DigitalGlobe

Few months back, we all read the news that Facebook has utilized satellite imagery to generate an estimate of population density over different regions of the Earth. This task was accomplished by Facebook Connectivity Lab, with the goal to identifying possible connectivity options for high population density (urban areas) and low population density (rural areas). These connectivity options can range from Wi-Fi, cellular network, satellite communication, and even laser communication via drones.

Facebook Connectivity Lab found that current population density estimates from censuses are insufficient for this planning purpose, and resolved to make their own high spatial resolution population density estimates from satellite data. What they did was take their computer vision techniques developed for face recognition and photo tagging suggestions in images and applied the same algorithms to analyzing high-resolution satellite imagery (50 cm pixel size) from DigitalGlobe. DigitalGlobe’s Geospatial Big Data platform was made available to Facebook, along with their algorithms for mosaicking and atmospheric correction. The technical methodology employed by DigitalGlobe and Facebook Connectivity Lab, is detailed in this white paper by Facebook. DigitalGlobe’s high resolution satellite data from the past 5 years or so (imagery from high-resolution WorldView and GeoEye satellites), were utilized, and they only used cloud-free visible RGB bands. For cloudy imagery, third party population data was used to fill in the gaps. On this big geospatial dataset from DigitalGlobe, the Facebook team analyzed 20 countries, 21.6 million square km, and 350 TB of imagery using convolutional neural networks. Their final dataset has 5 m resolution, particularly focusing on rural and remote areas, and improves over previous countrywide population density estimates by multiple orders of magnitude.

 

 

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About WQ

I received my PhD (2013) in Remote Sensing, Earth and Space Science at the Dept. of Aerospace Engineering Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA, under a Fulbright fellowship. Currently, I'm an Assistant Professor in the Dept. of Space Science at Institute of Space Technology (IST), Islamabad, Pakistan, where I have been a founding member of the Geospatial Research & Education Lab (GREL). My general expertise is in Remote Sensing where I have worked with various remote sensing datasets through my career, while for my PhD thesis I specifically worked on Remote Sensing using SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) and Oceanography, working extensively on development of techniques to measure ocean surface currents from space-borne SAR intensity images and interferometric data. My research interests are: Remote sensing, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery and interferometric data processing & analysis, Visible/Infrared/High-resolution satellite image processing & analysis, Oceanography, Earth system study and modelling, LIDAR data processing and analysis, Scientific programming. I am a reviewer for IEEE Transactions on Geoscience & Remote Sensing, Forest Ecosystems, GIScience & Remote Sensing, Journal of African Earth Sciences, and Italian Journal of Agronomy. I am an alumnus of Pakistan National Physics Talent Contest (NPTC), an alumnus of the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings, a Fulbright alumnus, and the Pakistan National Point of Contact for Space Generation Advisory Council (SGAC). I was an invited speaker at the TEDxIslamabad event held in Nov., 2014. I've served as mentor in the NASA International Space App Challenge Islamabad events in April 2015 and April 2016.

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